Posts

It seems that they won again

My previous post about creators of Go, who think different, ended with a phrase Does it mean that they right again? I don’t know, we will see…. And now we can say for sure that they were right again. If you didn’t hear it, then you should read this post. It’s an incident report from Cloudflare regarding significant vulnerability discovered in their service. But they didn’t mention the most important part, how it was found.

Think different

I named this post after a very well-known slogan from Apple advertising. But we will not talk about Apple, we will talk about Go, the programming language that was created by exactly that type of people. The landscape of programming languages is huge. But there are something common for almost all of them. They try to put a lot of new features with every release. Sometimes, they broke compatibility between different versions, like Scala or even broke their community into 2 parts, like Python.

Practical example of Go usage

In previous post I tried to describe why I started to look into Go. Today I want to share a small example of Go power. Some time ago we had a tiny Python script for monitoring purposes that runs into CI. Setup was simple: - download script from Git repo - download and run Docker container with Python environment - run monitoring script. The whole execution time in CI was around 10 seconds.

Why Go?

I looked at Go in early 2015. Of course, I heard about this language earlier, but at those moments he wasn’t very interesting for me. Things changed after I joined Russian-speaking Go community in Slack (golang-ru.slack.com). I found very interesting and skilled people there. And this was the main point that forced me to look at the language. I went on golang.org and read the documentation. After that, I tried to write a small CLI tool, which used for authentication via HTTP on some internal service.

Moving to Hugo

It finally happened!

After several attempts, I finally moved from Jekyll to Hugo.

I’m also moved from Github Pages back to Amazon S3. If you’re looking for a guide, try this one. It mentioned some things that weren’t clear in the process.

Importance of error handling

I found a nice article on twitter https://www.usenix.org/conference/osdi14/technical-sessions/presentation/yuan Some ideas from it looks very obvious, but they are important. Authors told us that “Catastrophic failures are caused by incorrect error handling”. Recently, I fall in love with Go. There are lot of different opinions about this language. One of heavily discussed points of language it’s a feature of language that forces developers to process any error in their code. Obviously, lots of people don’t like to do that.

Moving away from Ghost

On the first day of New Year, I moved my blog from Ghost, hosted on Digital Ocean, to static blog, hosted with Github Pages.

I already thought about that for some time and today was a great time for that.

Initially, I thought about using Hugo for generating static content, but at the end Jekyll was chosen.

How to test web applications

In my previous post I already started talking about web application testing. Today I want to share my thoughts about it. I think that sometimes we do it wrong. Our tests often become very bloated, because we are trying to do a lot of things in it. We may try to setup test prerequisites or we need to login in our app. Other problems can occur if we try to check everything via UI or check a lot of visual stuff in our tests.

Boxes of different color

Recently, I have had thoughts about how we approach testing, especially testing from a user’s side. “Selenium will save us”, they said, and yes, Selenium helps a lot. But when the initial dust settled, we found that there was no Holy Graal. What is bad about Selenium? There are many problems, but all of them are just consequences of the one main problem. For Selenium the application under test is a black box and this is the main problem.

Some thoughts about load testing

Recently, I helped our network team with load testing for our balancers for static content. My default choice for a long time was Gatling. It’s a great tool for the job, it’s easier to start with than JMeter, for example. You are capable to easily create scenarios and put logic into them, thanks to Scala. But recent events made me think that where is far more tools for different tasks.